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August 30, 2013

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Roezone

Awesome #CycleON

AlanM

While the document may be short on details, that’s to be expected. This is a strategy, not an operational plan, which is quite clear in the document itself, how it was created, and how it’s been introduced.
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The release of this document does mark a significant watershed in Ontario’s history. The plan was created through an extensive partnership and collaboration with stakeholders across the province at all levels of government and many interest groups.
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That such a document emerges as a policy platform for the government, spanning all ministries, and with the support of all significant stakeholders, including submissions in response to last November’s draft from over 1,000 parties, is indeed a noteworthy milestone.
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The document is clear that this 20 year framework will be implemented with a rolling series of action plans. That’s where to expect to see details on funding, priorities, initiatives and more. Organizing the first action plan is already underway, engaging the broad set of interest groups listed near the end of the strategy paper.
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For the first time, Ontario has a vision and set of goals towards which we can work in unison instead of at odds across a previously balkanized collection of groups. That isn’t to say there won’t be debate — that’s essential to creating meaningful progress.
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Count me in! And I look to the large majority of Ontarians who’ve already said they support these directions to also step forward to help.

Kevin Love

Noteably missing from the cycling "strategy" is the only thing that has ever, anywhere in the world achieved a significant cycle mode share.

Which is, of course Dutch-style protected cycling infrastructure that:

1) Makes cycling safe.
2) Makes cycling the fastest, easiest and most convenient way of getting from A to B for most trips.

This leads me to conclude that this cycling "strategy" will turn out to be a failure.

Dean

I heard the Ontario wants to stiffen penalties for the 'door prize' - how about make it the same as if you run into something while driving? The difference between hitting a stationary cyclist with a car vs stopping a moving cyclist with a door has no basis in physics - or attentiveness- or harm... The door prize is a nasty 'finishing move' in car-fu.

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Bill Bean


  • North America is eventually going to figure out that, for all the right reasons, we need more bicycles on our roads. Dust off your bicycle and go cycling. And if the gas-burning dinosaurs start to crowd you, it's your road and you paid for it. Take the lane for yourself.

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